Vital events

Population

Minifacts about Estonia 2017 (p. 10)

On 1 January 2017, the population of Estonia was 1.32 million, which makes us the fourth smallest country in the European Union after Malta, Luxembourg and Cyprus. The population of Estonia accounts for 0.26% of the total EU population.

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Population

Eesti Statistika Kvartalikiri. 2/17. Quarterly Bulletin of Statistics Estonia (p. 42)
Alis Tammur

In order to understand what is happening in demography, it is important to look at both the population structure (its distribution by sex and age) and the changes taking place: births, deaths and migration. These two sides are interconnected. For example, if the number of women in fertile age decreases in the population, the number of births drops. This article provides an overview of the current demographic situation in Estonia and changes that have occurred in recent years.

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Estonia’s net migration was positive in 2016

news release no 59

According to Statistics Estonia, 14,822 persons immigrated to and 13,792 persons emigrated from Estonia in 2016. Immigration exceeded emigration for the second year. Most of the migrants were Estonian citizens, but their net migration was negative.

Immigration by citizenship, 2016

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Population

Eesti statistika aastaraamat. 2016. Statistical Yearbook of Estonia (p. 55)
Alis Tammur, Helerin Äär, Koit Meres

On 1 January 2016, the population of Estonia was estimated at 1,315,944. Compared to 2015, this was 2,673 persons fewer. In 2015, natural increase was negative, as the number of deaths exceeded the number of births by 1,336. In external migration, immigration exceeded emigration by 2,410 persons. A part of the population increase (1,599) was due to the adoption of a new methodology, which revealed that there are more people living in Estonia than previously thought. The natural increase of Estonians was positive in 2008–2012, but since 2013 this indicator has been negative as well. In 2015, 80 more Estonians died than were born. Among counties, Harju and Tartu counties experienced population growth as a result of migration and positive natural increase. Both the net migration and natural increase were positive in these counties. The number of inhabitants grew the most in Tallinn. In absolute terms, the number of inhabitants dropped the most in Ida-Viru county (by 2,145), while the biggest percentage decline was recorded in Põlva, Valga and Hiiu counties (–1.5...–1.7%). In most counties, population decreased mainly due to migration. Pärnu and Viru counties were the only ones where the population decline due to migration was slightly smaller than the decline resulting from the difference between the number of births and deaths.

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Last year, immigration exceeded emigration for the first time after the restoration of independence in Estonia

news release no 59

According to Statistics Estonia, 15,413 persons immigrated to and 13,003 persons emigrated from Estonia in 2015. Net migration was 2,410 and natural increase -1,336, meaning that immigration compensated for the population decrease which occurred due to negative natural increase.

Diagram: Immigration by citizenship, 2015

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Population

Minifacts about Estonia 2016 (p. 6)

As at 1 January 2015, the population of Estonia was 1.3 million, which makes us the fourth smallest country in the European Union (EU) after Malta, Luxembourg and Cyprus. The population of Estonia accounts for 0.26% of the total EU population.

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Suburbanisation and identity: macro- and micro-level factors on the case of Viimsi rural municipality

Eesti piirkondlik areng. 2015. Regional Development in Estonia (p. 201)
Rivo Noorkõiv and Bianka Plüschke-Altof

The importance of urban areas in the development of Estonia has increased significantly since the 1990s and cities are increasingly viewed as the driving force of regional development and the main development nodes in global networks. This is mainly explained by macro-level socio-economical changes that started at the end of the socialist era. However, these changes do not fully explain the increased importance of urban areas.

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Will there be a new polarisation reversal in Estonia?

Eesti piirkondlik areng. 2015. Regional Development in Estonia (p. 76)
Garri Raagmaa

The purpose of the article is to discuss the possibility of a new urban-rural polarisation reversal in Estonia, as well as its prerequisites and consequences, based on significant new tendencies in the world and Europe. The rapid metropolisation in the last couple of decades, i.e. population convergence in metropolitan areas in Estonia and elsewhere in the world (megalopolises have grown particularly quickly in Asia and developing countries), has created an impression of an irreversible process.

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A conference devoted to register and big data opens today

news release no 115

Today, on 20 October, a conference of Statistics Estonia and the Estonian Statistical Society “Registers and Big Data in Statistics”, presenting the options of using register and big data, will be held in Viljandi.

Logo: Eesti Statistikaselts

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Rahvastiku areng. Population Trends

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The publication focuses on the processes that are related to the preservation of the population of Estonia and that determine the size, composition and distribution of the population. Natural demographic processes – births, deaths, population ageing – are analysed. Both internal and external migration is studied. Based on these aspects, the publication outlines the regional population projections for Estonia up to 2040 and explains the background of these projections.
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