National accounts

Publications and articles

Calculating the net growth value of standing forest

article
Annika Laarmaa

The European Union budget is financed from own resources based on the gross national income (GNI). The task of Eurostat is to monitor that the Member States’ contributions to the EU budget are correctly calculated on the basis of the GNI. If Eurostat finds that a Member State could modify the methodology for calculating the GNI, it submits a precept and requires improvement of the methodology. By autumn 2019, Statistics Estonia will have to make changes in the time series of the Estonian national accounts. Standing timber will have to be recorded as inventory of work-in-progress continuously over the entire growth period. Whereas so far only felled timber was recorded in output calculations, starting from autumn 2019 forest growth is taken into account as well.

formula

Read more

Economic growth in Estonia increased significantly

article
Robert Müürsepp

Economic growth in Estonia was broad-based. In the previous years, the growth was largely due to internal consumption, whereas in 2017, the growth became more broad‑based. The role of household consumption decreased. After years of decline, investments began to increase again as a result of improved economic climate, indicating a positive mind-set of entrepreneurs.

GDP chain-linked volume change, 2010‒2017

Read more

Gross domestic product

article
Minifacts about Estonia 2017 (p. 26)

In 2016, the gross domestic product (GDP) at current prices was 20.9 billion euros. The year was characterised by a slow but steady growth of the GDP. In Estonia, the real growth of the GDP was 1.6%, while the European Union’s GDP increased 1.9%.

Publication cover

Read more

National accounts

article
Annika Laarmaa
– Eesti Statistika Kvartalikiri. 2/17. Quarterly Bulletin of Statistics Estonia (p. 74)

In the second half of 2016, Estonia’s economic growth increased; most economic activities contributed to the growth of the gross domestic product. Both domestic and external demand increased as well. Although domestic demand was still slowed down by the decline in investments, private consumption expenditure remained high.

Publication cover

Read more

Progress of Estonian economy in light of European non-financial accounts

article
Robert Müürsepp
– Eesti Statistika Kvartalikiri. 3/16. Quarterly Bulletin of Statistics Estonia (p. 74)

Besides gross domestic product (GDP), national accounts include a number of other indicators, which provide valuable additional information for assessing the welfare of a region and can therefore drastically alter the understanding of trends prevailing in the economy. The article gives an overview of the nonfinancial accounts in this accounting system and compares the indicators of Estonia to those of other European Union countries.

Publication cover

Read more

National accounts

article
Annika Laarmaa
– Eesti statistika aastaraamat. 2016. Statistical Yearbook of Estonia (p. 187)

In 2015, the Estonian economy’s growth rate was one of the slowest ones in the European Union. In Estonia, the real growth of the gross domestic product (GDP) slowed down to 1.1%. Those ranking below Estonia included our neighbour Finland along with Austria, Italy and Greece. The GDP of the European Union (EU) as a whole grew 2.0%.

Publication cover

Read more

Gross domestic product

article
Minifacts about Estonia 2016 (p. 28)

The Estonian economy increased 1.1% in 2015. Comparing with the other Member States of the European Union, it was one of the lowest growth rates.

Publication cover

Read more

Regional development in Estonia based on regional value added

article
Robert Müürsepp
– Eesti Statistika Kvartalikiri. 3/15. Quarterly Bulletin of Statistics Estonia (p. 18)

Just as it is necessary to monitor various indicators to observe the development of a state, the same needs to be done at the regional level. Regular monitoring of regional development and comparing it with that of other areas allows making better decisions regarding issues that concern future activities, and setting target goals. While the significance of value added or gross domestic product (GDP) and that of related indicators can be viewed when talking about economic indicators at the national level, regional gross domestic product (RGDP) represents a tool for observing regional development at the regional level.

Publication cover

Read more

National accounts

article
Annika Laarmaa
– Eesti statistika aastaraamat. 2015. Statistical Yearbook of Estonia (p. 189)

In 2014, Estonia’s gross domestic product grew faster than the European Union average. At the same time, economic growth was still faster in Latvia and Lithuania. In Estonia, the real growth of the gross domestic product (GDP) decelerated to 2.1% last year, while the GDP of the European Union (EU) as a whole increased 1.3%.

Publication cover

Read more

Gross domestic product

article
Minifacts about Estonia 2015 (p. 28)

The entire year of 2014 was characterised by the slow but steady growth of the Estonian economy. In total, the Estonian GDP rose 2.1% in 2014, which was faster than the average growth of the Member States of the European Union.

Publication cover

Read more