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Education

Nowadays it is possible to change one’s career, acquire a new specialty or broaden one’s general knowledge at any point in life. A person’s education starts early on in kindergarten and continues in basic school. Many people study their whole lives. Adults have more learning opportunities than ever before. In addition to universities, one can study in training centres and participate in short courses. There are more and more e-learning programmes, which also makes international education more widely available.

Education statistics provide information on fields of education, educational institutions, education expenditures, students and graduates. Formal education data are obtained from the Estonian Education Information System (EHIS). Data on adult education are collected using internationally coordinated surveys (the Labour Force Survey, Adult Education Survey, Continuing Vocational Training Survey).

From education statistics, it is possible to find out

  • how many different educational institutions there are;
  • how many children go to kindergartens and schools;
  • what is the education level of people living in Estonia;
  • how many foreign students there are;
  • how many children and youth participate in hobby education;
  • how popular is studying among adults;
  • how enterprises contribute to continuing training of employees.

Statistics Estonia publishes education data to be used both in Estonia and internationally. Education statistics and international comparisons of education indicators are a basis for the national education policy. They allow comparing trends in Estonian education policy with those in other countries and using this information for better decision-making.

Persons with higher education 404,546
2.2%
2022
Persons aged 15 and over without education 2,437
-5.0%
2022
Children in preschool institutions 66,979
0.9%
2021
Enrolment in formal education 233 thousand
0.6%
2021
Share of participants in adult education 41 %
2016
Enrolment in formal education by type and level of education | 2012 – 2021
Unit: thousand
2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Total 231.9 226.2 222.9 221.9 222.1 223.6 225.9 227.9 231.6 233.0
General education 140.9 140.5 142.5 145.9 149.2 153.3 156.7 158.7 160.8 162.6
..basic school level 112.2 113.6 116.3 120.0 122.9 126.4 129.3 131.1 132.1 133.0
..gymnasium level 28.8 26.9 26.2 25.9 26.2 26.9 27.3 27.6 28.8 29.6
Vocational education 26.2 25.7 25.2 24.9 25.1 24.1 23.4 24.0 25.5 25.9
..vocational courses with no previous education requirement 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.8 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.6
..vocational courses after basic education 15.1 14.3 14.5 16.4 18.0 18.2 18.3 18.6 19.7 19.8
..vocational courses after secondary education 10.6 11.1 10.2 7.7 6.0 4.8 3.9 4.0 4.3 4.4
Higher education 64.8 60.0 55.2 51.1 47.8 46.2 45.8 45.2 45.3 44.6
..professional higher education 20.2 17.9 15.7 14.2 13.4 12.9 12.6 12.0 11.7 11.5
..Bachelor study 24.5 22.7 20.5 18.9 16.8 16.1 15.8 15.7 16.0 15.8
..integrated Bachelor's/Master's study 3.9 3.7 3.6 3.3 3.3 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.3 3.3
..Master's study 13.1 12.7 12.4 11.8 11.6 11.5 11.8 12.0 12.0 11.7
..Doctoral study 3.0 3.0 2.9 2.8 2.6 2.5 2.4 2.3 2.3 2.4

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